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How to Keep Your Trees Happy

BY: Leonard Simmons | Category: Others | Submitted: 2011-03-29 19:18:35
 
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Parents with several children will tell you that no single thing keeps all children happy. Happiness is individual. Is it the same with trees? There is certainly a large family of trees - thousands of species. For instance, a Virginia tree service will be concerned with the health of at least nine different kinds of native oaks alone. The good news for tree owners if that while every tree needs individual attention, there are some common areas of professional care that will keep any tree "happy".

Fertilization keeps trees strong. In order to ward off disease and insects a tree must be healthy. Proper, professional fertilization can also rescue a tree if it is not doing well. It will not reach full height and spread and will have a shorter life if it does not have the food it needs. In perfect circumstances it would be getting all it needs from the soil. But in a crowded urban environment, beneficial fungi may have been killed in the soil around a tree. Fertilization helps the tree fight back.

Pruning and trimming is very beneficial to the tree. A tree with all of the room in the world to spread and grow may be able to stay out of its own way. But a tree with others close by, as well as nearby buildings, must be encouraged to grow well and healthily. It surprises some people to know that pruning and trimming are often accomplished from the inside of the tree, to ensure that sunlight and air can penetrate to lower limbs. To promote classic, excellent shape, the tree may be "crowned"; that is, trimmed at the top to encourage shapely growth.

We mentioned allowing natural air flow through a tree. Air is also essential in the soil surrounding a tree, and so what is called "aerating" should accompany tree fertilization. We use our lawns, and love to be under and around our trees. This consistent traffic makes the soil hard and compacted, and this kills natural organisms. Normally these organisms would do their own aerating. A professional Virginia tree service will utilize specific tools designed to bring essential air into the soil. It involves a punching device, and expertise, to avoid damaging the sensitive root systems that are right there. Properly fertilized and aerated, trees and soil work together. Nature will do its stuff to keep a tree happy.

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http://www.absolutetreeserviceinc.com

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