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Means Of Compressing On The 64 Bit Platform - Protection And Packing

BY: jsogiros | Category: Technology and Computers | Post Date: 2010-01-20
 



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Questioning what packing is? Encrypting a file targeting to shrink its size is addressed as compression. In fact, contracting storage size as well as transmission efficiency are the goal of such processing. Compression can also be accomplished on a specific variety of data: the binary file. Either way, the final result is resulting to a lesser file size. Compression ratio is the relation of the initial against the compressed file size. Ratios differ depending on the algorithm used and depending on the original file.

Compression is mostly done because it takes place too often to run out of disk space. When compressed, files can not be utilised until they are decompressed again. Hence, compression is positive for archival or for emailing.

ZIP and RAR are well-known representatives of compression schemes for data. Binaries though must keep all start-up capabilities hence calling for special binary compression programs.

The act of compressing a binary (executable) file is frequently referred to as packing, a typical name for an executable compressing program then becomes a packer. The decompression code that is added to the compressed data is often called the decompression stub. Running a compressed executable essentially means that the decompression stub unpacks the initial executable code before passing control to the recomposed original binary. To the casual user, compressed and not compressed executables are identical.

Packers also have a different ground of existence: executable compression is used to obfuscate, to mask strings and to change signatures. Nevertheless, this can only slow down the process of reverse engineering. In general, executable compression is completely inadequate to put off cracking. The protectors are much more reliable for that intention.

Speed is not a main reason in favor of or against compressing an executable. That is explainable because a compressed software is smaller, hence taking less time to map. On the other hand, it takes time to decompress the data before execution starts which evens the total sum.

A compression example is the reduction of a text file. This is done by wiping out repetitive single words, word combinations and phrases that use up too much storage space to be good. The same applies as well for binary files with recurring bits and bytes. There can be media such as images whose data information occupies much more space than required. Even So, the document ...or file can be compressed to trim this inefficiency electronically.

Compression is possible in two modes: lossless and lossy. Lossy compression does not allow reproduction of a perfect copy though it provides a better compression ratio in return. If decompression produces an exact replication, then the compression is called lossless.

JPG and compressed sound are systems where there is actually missing as much as 90%. All the same, the fundamental data remains because the fundamental colours respectively the main sounds are maintained intact. This lossy compression gets rid of bits of data that - hopefully - are not necessary.

To accomplish lossless compression, algorithms produce reference points for patterns, stock them in a table and transmit the table with the now tighter encoded file. When decompressed, the file is re-generated by replacing the referenced points with the initial info. Lossless compression reduces without loss of info, also when decompressed.

Data and executable compression for 32 bit or for 64 bit are comparable on both platforms. In fact, all said in general is true for 64 bit programs. An application created in 32 bit is usually somewhat smaller than its 64 bit counterpart. However, there is frequently a better ratio for the 64 bit software compression because there are more alike patterns in this software since only the same number of basic bits and bytes exist for both. This causes that it is even more advisable to compress 64 bit programs.

Article Source: http://www.saching.com



About Author / Additional Info: Publishing about application safety and its compression tools is the hobby from Sogiros. The writer is a practiced programmer in the topic as well.

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